Defining types of merger integration

Here, we talk about merger integration type for results of the task for designing the new entity. Designing the new entity has to support or fulfill goals of the merger integration strategy. So let us look at dimensions of merger integration strategy.

Dimensions of merger integration strategy

The model of Haspeslagh/Jemison* offers two dimensions for determining the integration type: Strategic interdependence and Need for organizational autonomy.

Strategic interdependence relates to value creation from sharing of resources, from transfer of functional skills or management skills and from combination benefits.

The need for organizational autonomy describes the reasoning behind leaving the targets or parts of the target organization autonomous. So you have to answer questions like

  • "Is autonomy preservation essential to reach acquisition goals and objectives?"

  • "How much autonomy should the target still have post integration?"

  • "What are the specific areas of autonomy of the target?"

 

The four Merger integration Types

In the high level model above, you end up with four generic types of post merger integration:

  1. Preservation: The target company is preserved meaning that you leave the target company autonomous. Nevertheless, integration of financial reporting and financial processes might make sense.
  2. Holding: The acquiring company just keeps the ownership of the target company, but does not integrate the target company.
  3. Symbiosis: In this merger type, you decide where integration is needed to reach the objectives of the merger integration.
  4. Absorption: the acquiring company fully absorbs the target company. All organizations and processes of the target company are to be fully integrated into the acquiring company.

Choosing the right merger integration type

Based on the literature, the following heuristics help to choose the right integration type.

Learn more at the workshop.....

 

* Source: Haspeslagh, P.C., Jemison, D.B., Managing Acquisitions: Creating Value through Corporate Renewal, New York, 1991.

 

(C) Dr. Karl Popp 2016